When we all get to heaven

Words: Eliza Edmunds Hewitt (b. June 28, 1851; d. Apr. 24, 1920)
Music: Emily Divine Wilson (b. May 24, 1865; d. June 23, 1942)

Sing the wondrous love of Jesus,
Sing His mercy and His grace.
In the mansions bright and blessèd
He’ll prepare for us a place.

When we all get to Heaven,
What a day of rejoicing that will be!
When we all see Jesus,
We’ll sing and shout the victory!

While we walk the pilgrim pathway,
Clouds will overspread the sky;
But when traveling days are over,
Not a shadow, not a sigh.

When we all get to Heaven,
What a day of rejoicing that will be!
When we all see Jesus,
We’ll sing and shout the victory!

Let us then be true and faithful,
Trusting, serving every day;
Just one glimpse of Him in glory
Will the toils of life repay.

When we all get to Heaven,
What a day of rejoicing that will be!
When we all see Jesus,
We’ll sing and shout the victory!

Onward to the prize before us!
Soon His beauty we’ll behold;
Soon the pearly gates will open;
We shall tread the streets of gold.

When we all get to Heaven,
What a day of rejoicing that will be!
When we all see Jesus,
We’ll sing and shout the victory!

A disclaimer is important when singing this song. The phrase “when we all get to heaven”  assumes that all who are singing are believers who have been saved and are looking forward to the second coming of the Lord. That they are the bonafide redeemed of the Lord. It is necessary to note that not all who sing this song will truly get to heaven because some will end up in hell even after singing this song. It depends on whether Christ their passport into heaven or not. Before you sing this song, make sure that you pause and ponder anew whether you really are redeemed by Christ. Have you had an encounter with Christ. Coming one one one and you realising that Jesus is the only source of hope and salvation for you. I am asking whether you have accepted Christ as your personal saviour.  That you can identify with the hymn writter that, my sin not in part but the whole, is nailed to the cross and I bear it no more. That Christ has regarded my helpless estate and has shed his own blood for my soul. mThat Christ has truly not just in song but in reality has taken away the shame and clothed you with his own righteousness and when God now looks at you, He does not see your sin, but the righteuousness of Christ and on that basis give you confidence that you will one day get to heaven and qualify you to sing this song. Otherwise these words mean nothing for you and all singing is but in vain.  You would rather stop here and contnue with business as usual and awit the time of sentencing into hell. What a sad reality that not all can and should sng “When We All Get to Heaven” . We must remember that not everyione who says Lord Lord will enter the kingdom. Not all who say are of Christ really are sons of God.  (I Peter 4:17-18). Of the called, few are saved (Matthew 22:14; cf. Colossians 3:15 and I Thessalonians 2:12). The phrase “when we all get to heaven” suggests that we are all going to be in eternity with the Lord. Can we say that about everyone sitting in the assembly singing this song? If we do sing this song, maybe a disclaimer ought to be made establishing that the words we are singing assume all present are faithful.

Having said so, this song is based on the scripture in 1 Thessalonians 4:17-18; “After that, we who are still alive and are left will be caught up together with them in the clouds to meet the Lord in the air. And so we will be with the Lord forever. Therefore encourage each other with these words.”

A beautiful inspiring hymn of old, it has inspired believers in Christ for many generations to anticipate the glories that await us in God’s great Home. The author of this text, Eliza Edmunds Hewitt, was a school teacher in Philadelphia and a Christian lay worker who was deeply devoted to the Sunday school movement. Like many of the other gospel song writers during the latter half of the nineteenth century, Eliza’s goal in writing her songs was to reach children and teach them the basic truths of the gospel. She dedicated this particular song to her own Sunday school class in Philadelphia. Eliza had her career cut short by a serious spinal problem. As an invalid she turned to hymn writing just as her cousin Edgar Page States had done. She was a lay worker who had deeply devoted her life to the Sunday School movement. Though an invalid for much of her life, Eliza was always active and enjoyed a long personal friendship with Fanny Crosby. These two women met often for fellowship and discussion of their new hymns. Eliza Hewitt wrote other gospel hymn texts such as “More About Jesus,” “Stepping in the Light,” and “There Is Sunshine in My Soul Today.”

Miss Hewitt often attended the Methodist camp meetings at Ocean Grove, New Jersey. It was here that she collaborated with Emily Wilson, the wife of a Methodist district superintendent in Philadelphia, in the writing of this triumphant gospel hymn–a favorite of young and old alike. “When We All Get to Heaven” was first published in 1898.

The anticipation of heaven has often been described as the oxygen of the human soul. “Everyone who has this hope in him purifies himself, just as he is pure” (1 John 3:3). When by His grace I shall look on His face, That will be glory, be glory for me. –Charles H. Gabriel.  Allow this glorious hope to brighten each day and keep you “true, faithful, trusting, serving . . .”

This is one of those simple gospel songs that contains some encouraging and challenging Bible truth. It begins with a joyous celebration of the promises of the Lord Jesus in John 14:2-3…

“In My Father’s house are many mansions; if it were not so, I would have told you. I go to prepare a place for you. And if I go and prepare a place for you, I will come again and receive you to Myself; that where I am, there you may be also.”

Should we sing the wondrous love, grace, and mercy of Jesus? Yes. Singing is a way of praising (Romans 15:9), teaching (Colossians 3:16), and offering thanks to God (Psalms 30:4). The love of God, His grace, and mercy through Christ is something we ought to sing praises, teach about, and offer thanks for (Psalms 59:16-17, Isaiah 49:13, and Titus 3:4-8).

In succeeding stanzas, Eliza Hewitt deals with three related themes. First (in Tanza-2) she reminds us that, though this life for the Christian may include suffering and sorrow, that will all be over when we go to our heavenly home. These thoughts surely encouraged her, in her long and painful suffering (from a back injury).

“I consider that the sufferings of this present time are not worthy to be compared with the glory which shall be revealed in us….For our light affliction, which is but for a moment, is working for us a far more exceeding and eternal weight of glory” (Rom. 8:18; II Cor. 4:17; cf. Rev. 21:4).

Since God has promised this glorious future to the saints, we should keep our present challenges in perspective. Let’s keep on keeping on. One glimpse of the Lord Jesus Christ will make whatever we must endure now all worthwhile (Stanza 3). Stanza-4 seems to allude to Paul’s declaration in Philippians 3:13-14…“Brethren, I do not count myself to have apprehended [attained what is expected of me]; but one thing I do, forgetting those things which are behind and reaching forward to those things which are ahead, I press toward the goal for the prize of the upward call of God in Christ Jesus.”

Vs. 13 has been interpreted various ways. Some see it as a reference to the heavenly rewards Christians will receive at the judgment seat of Christ. Others see the upward summons of Christ itself to be the prize–as though it will be an indication that the individual’s life work has been completed successfully. Either way:

Further thought about this hymn.

  1. Should we sing the wondrous love, grace, and mercy of Jesus? Yes. Singing is a way of praising (Romans 15:9), teaching (Colossians 3:16), and offering thanks to God (Psalms 30:4). The love of God, His grace, and mercy through Christ is something we ought to sing praises, teach about, and offer thanks for (Psalms 59:16-17, Isaiah 49:13, and Titus 3:4-8).
  1. In the mansions bright and blessed will Jesus prepare for us a place? Yes, (John 14:1-3). We can even declare the terms bright and blessed because in Heaven God will be with us (John 1:5).
  1. Do we walk the pilgrim pathway with clouds overspreading the sky? Yes, (Hebrews 11:13- 16 and I Peter 2:11). Darkness, which we could assume would be the clouds overspreading the sky, is all about us (Ephesians 6:12 and I Peter 2:9).
  1. Will travelling days end and there not be a shadow or a sigh? Yes, once the saved get to Heaven the travel is over and there will be no partial darkness or sighing (I Peter 1:3-9).
  1. Should we be true, faithful, trusting, and serving everyday in light of the reward of a mansion above? Yes, (Romans 13:13-14, Revelation 2:10, II Corinthians 1:8-10, and Hebrews 12:28).
  1. Will just one glimpse of Christ in glory repay the toils of life? Yes, (I Peter 4:12-13, II Timothy 2:9-11, and Colossians 3:1-4; 24-25).
  1. Will the day wherein we all get to heaven be a day of rejoicing? When all the believers get to heaven. Surely it will be (Philippians 2:14-18 and I Thessalonians 2:19-20).
  1. Will we all sing and shout the victory when we see Jesus? When all the saints got to Heaven, yes (I Corinthians 15:52-57; cf. Psalms 32:10-11).
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One Response to When we all get to heaven

  1. austinbhebe says:

    Your comments just remind us not to take the grace of God for granted. Freedom to worship and have access to information is a blessing. Be strong in the Lord and He will sustain you in whatever environment He has placed you. He knows your name and your circumstances and will come through for you.

    Like

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